ADJUSTER LICENSING RECIPROCITY & DESIGNATED HOME STATE INFORMATION

WebCE is excited to offer insurance claims adjuster licensing courses for Texas and Florida. These adjuster licensing courses allow you to prepare for and complete your adjuster licensing exam entirely online from anywhere at anytime. Once the state of Texas or Florida issues your adjuster license, you can apply for licenses in more than 30 other states offering a reciprocal license or accepting Texas and Florida as designated home states. This means you can be licensed in multiple states with just one online course and exam! You can view which states accept Texas and Florida as designated home states as well as lists of which states do not license adjusters or offer reciprocity.


States Accepting DHS License   States Not Licensing Adjusters   States Not Offering Reciprocity

 

WHAT IS A DESIGNATED HOME STATE?

Adjusters who live in a state not requiring adjuster licensure can receive a non-resident license by claiming a designated home state. Florida and Texas allow licensees to claim either state as their designated home state. This means out-of-state adjusters can apply for a resident license in Florida or Texas. Once you are issued a Florida or Texas adjuster license, you can apply for non-resident licenses in any state with reciprocal agreements. Please check with the appropriate department of insurance for the respective state(s) you intend to be licensed to confirm application requirements.

TX Adjuster Licensing Requirements   FL Adjuster Licensing Requirements



WebCE offers insurance adjuster exam prep courses for Florida and Texas to be used as Designated Home States

TYPES OF ADJUSTER LICENSES

There are three main types of insurance claims adjusters:

  • Staff claims adjusters work exclusively for a specific insurance firm. Staff adjusters are usually salaried employees who receive benefits including health insurance, retirement plans, and continuing education training. Staff adjusters respond only to claims for the insurance.

  • Independent claims adjusters work as contract employees, often for several different insurance firms or third-party administrators. Independent adjusters often work with catastrophe insurance claims and subsequently have to travel to areas impacted by tornados, hurricanes, earthquakes, or other major natural disasters. Insurance companies often hire independent adjusters if they do not have an in-house adjuster of their own in the area.

  • Public claims adjusters are usually contract workers (but can also be salaried) who work directly on behalf of insurance policyholders, as opposed to working for the insurance company. Public adjusters are employed to help individuals or businesses file their insurance claims if their insurer proposes a settlement that seems insufficient. It’s a public adjusters job to help the policyholder obtain the highest possible settlement from their insurer.

STATES ACCEPTING TEXAS AND FLORIDA AS DESIGNATED HOME STATES

The following states accept Texas and Florida Designated Home State Licenses (licensee does not reside in either TX or FL and has designated either TX or FL as their "Designated Home State").

STATES THAT DO NOT LICENSE ADJUSTERS

The following states do not have an adjuster licensing requirement. Residents of these states who want a claims adjuster license may use Texas or Florida as a designated home state.

  • Colorado
  • District of Columbia
  • Illinois
  • ​Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Missouri
  • Nebraska
  • New Jersey
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Pennsylvania
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Virginia
  • Wisconsin

STATES NOT OFFERING RECIPROSITY

Adjusters with licenses from these states or territories cannot receive a reciprocal license in any other state. In states that license adjusters, licensees from these states and territories will need to complete another state's required education and licensing exam in order to be licensed in that state.

  • California
  • New York
  • Hawaii
  • Guam
Non-resident licensing fees, procedures, and reciprocity rules are subject to change at any time. Please check with the Department of Insurance for the respective state(s) for which you intend to be licensed in order to confirm current application requirements and individual state information.